100 Humans

100 Humans

Netflix Series
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6.9

Fair

2.3

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100 Humans takes a range of people across all ages, races, and backgrounds and puts them to the test to answer some of life's most common questions about hum behaviour. Incredibly unscientific but still entertaining.

100 Humans is a surprisingly funny and engaging reality series that follows one hundred people as they undergo a range of tests and experiments. 100 Americans from all different backgrounds, ages, races, and genders have volunteered their time in a bid to really find out the answers to some of life's most commonly asked questions. The show is hosted by three presenters, Alie Ward (Brainchild), Zainab Johnson and Sammy Obeid. Together they run the tests and provide some very funny social commentary in the background.

So what is 100 Humans trying to achieve? First off, it's not a particularly deep scientific study, it's more of a fun set of tests designed to both entertain and inform. Most are pretty superficial like ‘What makes us attractive' or ‘Are we unconsciously biased'. They are certainly interesting, if devoid of all science. That said, the show isn't aiming for Nobel prize. It's simply entertaining.

Each episode starts with the 100 Humans gathered together, each standing in a square. From there their first challenge begins. For example, they are all asked questions with the results then used as the basis for the episode's theme. So with a show of hands, they get asked if they believe they have a better memory than the other 99 humans. Then they get broken into groups and take part in some fun games to see which age group has the best memory and so on…

The thing about 100 Humans is that if you expected it to be grounded in any scientific basis whatsoever, you will be disappointed. The tests are largely fun games that would never be used to determine any real outcomes. That said, some of the stuff is very interesting and you can play along at home.

As a scientific show, 100 Humans misses the mark completely. However, if you want to be entertained and mildly intrigued, then it is actually quite a good watch. The three hosts are funny and witty and the participants all seem quite honest with their opinions so don't dismiss it entirely. It's a no for science but a yes for entertainment.


Good

  • Some Experiments Are Interesting
  • Really Good Hosts
  • Entertaining and Funny

Bad

  • Devoid Of All Real Science
  • Some Terrible Tests
6.9

Fair

2 Comments

  1. As a human who has specialized in weapons, I have to say that the Season 1: Episode 4 test on firing at JP,”the black man”, is very biased in the set up, therefore the experiment subconsciously swayed the results. Your eyes, brain, etc. are automatically drawn to red and bright colors. When rewatching and rewatching, you will see that the “black people” were wearing red shirts and which subconsciously pulling your attention to whomever that person is. A more accurate test, would have everyone dressed the same. On other experiments there are certain “keywords” said that subconsciously sway decisions prior to ther experiment (ex: the doll experiment).

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  2. I found 100 Humans to be very bigoted and racist in a reverse sort of way.

    In the last episode I watched, they cited an experiment from the 1940s, where 100 children were given a choices of dolls that were identical except for skin color. The offensive part of the show was that the host stated that the white children were called “the bigoted children” and they cited that the “bigoted children”chose the white skinned dolls to play with and they used the term “white bias” to explain it. Problem is, they didnt even mention the results from the black children. The entire show was aimed at the white children and how they were bigoted.

    It all seemed like a racially slanted approach and was clearly meant to be overly PC. This show has no rooting in science or unbiased scientific approaches and it is apparently simply entertainment and only serves the purpose of enforcing the host’s and the network’s opinions of themselves.

    That was my third, but also my last episode of this farce of a show.

    Reply

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